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10 hottest trending restaurants in Dublin right now

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud

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Ireland’s only 2 star Michelin restaurant, this five star fine dining experience on Merrion Sq is sure to delight so long as you don’t mind paying the premium.

Zaytoon

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Undoubtedly the most sought after source of sustenance in Dublin on weekends after 2 am Zaytoon is much more than a post-pub munch. Bosting mouth watering Gourmet kebabs starting from a poultry 7 euro, there is surely no match for this middle eastern marvel.

Beshoff Bros

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The legendary fish and chip shop located on O’Connell St offers many treats but surely chief among them are the battered smoked cod and the legendary thick cut chips. Some chipper lovers may proclaim Leo Burdocks as the best but Beshoffs is truly the reigning chipper champ on these shores.

The Pig’s Ear

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Serving bistro food at masterchef quality The Pig’s Ear has firmly established itself as one of Dublin’s hippest hot spots. Situated on Nassua street, just look for the pink door, but be sure to make a reservation before hand as this is usually jam-packed.

Flanagans


A family run business since the 80′s, Flanagans is the place to go for proper home style meals. The Irish stew and the full Irish breakfast make this a must for repeat visits for anyone looking for a true taste of Ireland.

Winding Stair

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With an undeniable charm to it from the moment you enter – it’s literally up a winding staircase up to the restaurant, this higlhy praised eatery offer top class food at affordable prices.

Alfies
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A delightful Dublin restaurant that too often gets overlooked, the South William St stalworth has one of the best lunch offers in Dublin with a great pick and mix selection for only €10.

Pearl Brasserie Restaurant
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Awarded best fine dining restaurant in Dublin & Ireland in 2009, 2010 & 2011 Pearl Brasserie offers a delightful dinner experience without requiring a bloated bank account featuring a two course early bird menu at €25.

Jo ‘Burger
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Jo ‘Burger features burgers the size of a moderate sized child’s head all in a unique comic book style setting. Armed with some seriously seductive taste combos such as the ‘ikqezi’ burger(caramelized chili banana, bacon & goats cheese) Jo Burger is the go-to gourmet burger joint in town. Some say that Bunson Burger on Camden St is the new holy grail but their small menu and long wait times just can’t compare.

Locks Brasserie

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A romantic canal-side restaurant just a five minute taxi ride from the city centre, Locks Brasserie is the ideal place for couples.

What To Do This Weekend April 25-26 2015

Are you off this weekend? We have a lists of things you can do this weekend from events, concerts and activities.

Events This Weekend

Sister Act Broadway Musical

If you are into musical we have two available events for you. The Broadway Musical Sister Act is going to be in Dublin this whole weekend at The National Concert Hall

Madama Butterfly

Fantastic opera is going to be on this weekend called Madama Butterfly at the Bord Gais Theatre Dublin, This is a sad one it based on Love and Pain.

An American naval officer, Lieutenant Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton, arrives in Japan to take up his duties on a ship docked in Nagasaki. On the suggestion of his friend Sayre, he takes a Japanese wife and house for the duration of his stay there. His young bride, Cho-Cho-San, is a geisha whose family were strongly in favor of the marriage until Pinkerton forbade them from visiting. When they learned that they would not be allowed to visit they disowned Cho-Cho-San. Pinkerton’s ship eventually sets sail from Japan. In his absence and unbeknownst to him, she gives birth to their child, a son whom she names Trouble. As time goes by, Cho-Cho-San is still convinced that Pinkerton will return to her some day, but her maid, Suzuki, becomes increasingly skeptical. Then Goro, a marriage broker, arrives and proposes that she divorce Pinkerton, telling her that even if he does come back, he will leave her and take the child with him. He proposes a Japanese husband to look after her—Yamadori, a prince who had lived a long time in America. Although she has no intention of going through with Goro’s plan, she tells him to arrange a meeting with Yamadori. You can read the rest of the story at the Wikipedia page

Live Gigs

The Business Live Gig at JJ’s Smyths

If you want to listen to a fine blue jam The Business is going to be in JJ’s Smyths tomorrow 25th April 2015 at 9pm. The ticket is EUR10.00.

Sunday Noon Concert FREE ADMISSION

Every weekend at the Hugh lane they held a concert for everyone for Free.

Comedy Shows

Totally Wired plus guests

Do you want to laugh this weekend well Totally Wired Comedy show at the Laughter Lounge is for you. Bring your friends, Girlfriends or Boyfriend or your family to the comedy show and enjoy!

Exhibitions

If art if for you then I have a list of place gallery place for you to which you can visit and appreciate art.



Oriel Gallery, there is no admission fee just go in and explore.

National Gallery Dublin, They are actually hosting the master collection exhibition right now and it is worth a visit.

Science Gallery Dublin

Temple Bar Gallery

Dublinia Exhibition

The Doorway Gallery

#20 MINDBLOWING FoodHacks To Try

#20 MINDBLOWING FoodHacks To Try

1. Straw the berries

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2. Pancake Bacons

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3. Fill that Taco.

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5. Chop The Sticks Hack

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6. No more Drips.

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7. Bugs out the drinks.

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8. Cut potatoes with an apple corer, for easy wedges.
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9. Sensational chocolate bowl.

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10. Easy Corn

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11.Split that Banana

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12. Orange styled
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13. Dou Big Mac

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14. Eggshells no more.

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15. Bacon & Cinnamon.

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16. Mouth Watering Marshmallow Dip

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17. Lemon Slices that looked like a flower

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18. Oreo cubes

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19. Those are some cheesy bread sticks

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20. Stringy cheesy bites

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Source: pemzo

#10 SHOCKING FACTS you might not know about St. Patrick and Ireland

#10 SHOCKING FACTS you might not know about St. Patrick and Ireland




The following 10 facts may help you to better enjoy this popular holiday.

#10. March 17th is when Patrick died.

Saint Patrick is a saint of the Catholic Church, and his holy day is the day of his death, and subsequent entrance to heaven, rather than the day of his physical birth. After spending most of his adult life converting the pagans of Ireland to Christianity, St. Patrick went to his reward on March 17, 461 AD.

Keep the Saint in St. Patrick’s Day! Shop these remarkable Catholic products.

#9. St. Patrick wasn’t Irish.

St. Patrick wasn’t Irish, and he wasn’t born in Ireland. Patrick’s parents were Roman citizens living in modern-day England, or more precisely in Scotland or Wales (scholars cannot agree on which). He was born in 385 AD. By that time, most Romans were Christians and the Christian religion was spreading rapidly across Europe.

#8. St. Patrick was a slave.

At the age of 16, Patrick had the misfortune of being kidnapped by Irish raiders who took him away and sold him as a slave. He spent several years in Ireland herding sheep and learning about the people there. At the age of 22, he managed to escape. He made his way to a monastery in England where he spent 12 years growing closer to God.

#7. St. Patrick used the shamrock to preach about the trinity.

Many claim the shamrock represents faith, hope, and love, or any number of other things but it was actually used by Patrick to teach the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and how three things, the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit could be separate entities, yet one in the same. Obviously, the pagan rulers of Ireland found Patrick to be convincing because they quickly converted to Christianity.

#6. Legend says St. Patrick drove all the snakes from Ireland.

According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes, or in some translations, “toads,” out of Ireland. In reality, this probably did not occur, as there is no evidence that snakes have ever existed in Ireland, the climate being too cool for them to thrive. Despite that, scholars suggest that the term “snakes” may be figurative and refer to pagan religious beliefs and practices rather than reptiles or amphibians.

#5. St. Patrick’s color is blue.

The original color associated with St. Patrick is blue, not green as commonly believed. In several artworks depicting the saint, he is shown wearing blue vestments. King Henry VIII used the Irish harp in gold on a blue flag to represent the country. Since that time, and possibly before, blue has been a popular color to represent the country on flags, coats-of-arms, and even sports jerseys.

Green was associated with the country later, presumably because of the greenness of the countryside, which is so because Ireland receives plentiful rainfall. Today, the country is also referred to as the “Emerald Isle.”

#4. The Shamrock is not the symbol of Ireland.

The shamrock is a popular Irish symbol, but it is not the symbol of Ireland. As early as the medieval period, the harp has appeared on Irish gravestones and manuscripts. However, it is certain that the harp was popular in Irish legend and culture even well before that period.

Since the medieval period, the harp has represented the nation. King Henry VIII used the harp on coins as early as 1534. Later, the harp was used on Irish flags and Irish coats of arms. The harp was also used as a symbol of the Irish people during their long struggle for freedom. Starting in 1642 the harp appeared on flags during rebellions against English rule. When Ireland became an independent country in 1921, it adopted the harp as the national symbol.

#3. There are more Irish in the USA than Ireland.

Well, sort of. An estimated 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry. Some are pure-blood Irish, meaning they or their parents came from Ireland, but many more have mixed ancestry today. By contrast, there are 4.2 million people living in Ireland. This peculiarity has a lot to do with the troubled history of Ireland. During the potato famine in Ireland, millions of Irish left the country for the US. This diaspora of Irish continued throughout much of the 19th century. Great numbers of Irish immigrants filled factories, served as railroad laborers –and even joined the military, sometimes immediately upon stepping foot on American soil! During the US Civil War, entire regiments of troops were comprised exclusively of Irish immigrants. It wasn’t until the economic boom of the 1990s that more Irish stayed in their native country than traveled abroad searching for better pportunities.

#2. St. Patrick’s Day in the US has a strong political history.

In the mid 19th century, the Irish faced discrimination much like that faced by African Americans. In a few rare instances, prejudice against the Irish was even more fierce! The Irish were culturally unique, Catholic, and because of deplorable conditions in Ireland, flooded into the US in large numbers. They were perceived as a potentially disloyal and were treated harshly. To combat this, the American Irish began to organize themselves politically. By the end of the 19th century, St. Patrick’s Day was a large holiday for the Irish and an occasion for them to demonstrate their collective political and social might. While the political emphasis has faded along with the discrimination, the holiday remains ever popular as an opportunity for festivity regardless of one’s cultual background.

#1. St. Patrick’s was a dry holiday in Ireland until 1970.

Aside from the color green, the activity most associated with St. Patrick’s Day is drinking. However, Irish law, from 1903 to 1970, declared St. Patrick’s Day a religious observance for the entire country meaning that all pubs were shut down for the day. That meant no beer, not even the green kind, for public celebrants. The law was overturned in 1970, when St. Patrick’s was reclassified as a national holiday – allowing the taps to flow freely once again.

Bonus Fact: Your odds of finding a four-leaf clover are:


About 1 in 10,000.

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